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POSTINGS

themindofkeezy asked: So who you want in the draft I'm hoping for Exum myself?

I’m going for either Embiid (first choice) or Exum.

Would love for Embiid to be the next great Laker center. Slightly worried about his back issues, but then again Drummond had pretty much the same back issues. Could be that Embiid is still growing into his body.

A big fan of Exum too, though. Haven’t seen much of him, but when he plays against top competition (here) like Wiggins, Randle, Parker, etc. he more than holds his own. Plus he’d be able to guard opposing point guards much better than the current Lakers guards can, and the West is full of explosive pg’s.

Either way, I hope we get someone good. All this losing can’t have been for naught.

gotemcoach:

Hell on Earth

For those of you who were too young to remember, the Lakers lost 1 game in the 2001 playoffs. One. Game. Started off 11-0 before losing to Philly in Game 1 of the Finals.

gotemcoach:

Hell on Earth

For those of you who were too young to remember, the Lakers lost 1 game in the 2001 playoffs. One. Game. Started off 11-0 before losing to Philly in Game 1 of the Finals.

lowerclassconspiracy:

Elmo

lowerclassconspiracy:

Elmo

(Source: vintagelakers)


If this season could be described in one gif …

(Source: theagonyofdefeat)

Lakers trade Steve Blake to Warriors for Kent Bazemore and MarShon Brooks.
The move gives the Warriors a much needed backup point guard for Steph Curry, and cuts the Lakers’ luxury tax hit about $3.5 million.
Brooks is on an expiring deal and Bazemore will be an unrestricted free agent unless he’s tendered a $1.1 million qualifying offer. Probably unlikely that that happens, however.

Lakers trade Steve Blake to Warriors for Kent Bazemore and MarShon Brooks.

The move gives the Warriors a much needed backup point guard for Steph Curry, and cuts the Lakers’ luxury tax hit about $3.5 million.

Brooks is on an expiring deal and Bazemore will be an unrestricted free agent unless he’s tendered a $1.1 million qualifying offer. Probably unlikely that that happens, however.

"Steve Nash finally made it back to the Lakers and has told a few friends this is going to be it, even though he has one season to go on his contract, at $9.7 million. Nash, who turned 40 Friday, doesn’t expect to help much, but that’s been the story of his injury-plagued Laker career. He really missed the camaraderie with his teammates when he was out for three months with a nerve injury in his back, and says he wants to experience that for at least the last part of this season before he calls it a career."

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/basketball/lawrence-all-star-weekend-players-fight-tennessee-tax-article-1.1607126
nbaoffseason:

stevenlebron:

Book Update #9: Kobe Excerpt
So, I’ve (obviously) been talking about my book a lot here on the blog, and shared a lot of the artwork and layouts, but what about the writing? Well, happy you asked, because Andrew Ungvari, wrote a great foreword for my Kobe article, detailing Kobe’s relationship with the city of Los Angeles. 
The foreword was posted at Lakers Nation yesterday and I’ve posted it below. Again, order your copy of the book now while quantities are still available, the online store link is here and if you are just finding out about the project, this FAQ is your primer. 
Enjoy:
The relationship between a city and a star athlete is one of those things that can be described as both ridiculous and incredible. Ridiculous because often it is only a notch below stalker on the crazy scale and incredible in that one person’s ability to perform a skill has the ability to unite a city and remove those invisible barriers between strangers.
More often than not, it is no different from a husband and a wife or a father and son. Sometimes it is one that ends in an ugly divorce where the kids side with one parent over the other. Sometimes it ends in an amicable divorce where both sides openly admit to falling out of love and doing what’s best for everyone involved.
In the case of Kobe Bean Bryant, the relationship between he and the City of Los Angeles is one with many layers. You could say it most closely resembles that of a foster family. Kobe was the hotheaded teen that had a falling out with his parents, got kicked out of the house, and thought he knew everything when, in fact, he didn’t know shit about the things that mattered. L.A. was the naïve mom that was going to defend her son because he was her son dammit, and that was as good a reason as any. He might be an asshole, but he is my asshole.
If you asked a hundred Angelenos what Kobe means to them, you might get a different answer from everyone. If you asked someone born before 1990, they might tell you that Kobe is the torchbearer in a long line of Lakers and star players who have represented the city. Ask someone born after that, and you might hear words like idol, worship, deity, and God.
You can not begin to understand what Kobe means to the city without first understanding what the Lakers mean to the city. Like every other major metropolitan city, L.A. is made up of transplants from all over the world, many of whom will not get out of their cars in neighborhoods, where the billboards and storefronts are written in languages they do not understand. As a result, most prefer to be scared or remain ignorant rather than celebrate and share in all of these rich and wonderful cultures and nationalities. Heaven forbid we might enjoy the food in Thai Town or maybe learn something new at the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo.
Something magical happens when the Lakers win a championship. We all put our guards down and become a little nicer. We’re more likely to exchange a smile and a nod at a red light with the guy in the car next to us—the one with all the Lakers flags and LKRLOVR on the vanity plate. Suddenly, everyone is approachable. You can tell because you will end up having conversations about the Lakers with complete strangers everywhere you go.
It is at the championship parades when we see the city at its utopian best. That is when we laugh together, cheer together, and cry tears of joy together. Any athlete or owner that has played a part in bringing that feeling to the city will forever be remembered. Those who have done it as many times as Magic or Kobe are granted iconic status. They move from the sports section to the front page, from sports heroes to a part of the city’s history.
Magic was my hero growing up, so my feelings for Kobe are a little complicated. I’m not one of those people who thinks he is better than Michael Jordan or even the greatest Laker ever. I can not understand how anyone who was raised on Magic’s brilliance would not prefer his approach to watching a guy take 30 shots a game. That does not mean that I’m still not amazed not only by the things that Kobe can do, but by what he can still do after so many years of mileage.
I would best describe having season tickets during the Kobe Era like getting two for every one you buy. There’s the physical ticket gets you inside the building, and then there’s the invisible lottery ticket that comes with it—the one that gives you the chance at witnessing history. You could say that a ticket to any game in any sport comes with the chance to witness something historic. The difference with Kobe is that it is almost expected.
It could be a miracle shot at the buzzer that sends a game into overtime, followed by another that wins it in overtime. It could be 21 points in the game’s final 12 minutes to lead the Lakers back from a 27-point fourth quarter deficit. It could be 42 points in a half, like he did in his final game against Michael Jordan, or the 62 points he has scored in only three quarters, or the 81 points he scored against Toronto.
I’m 36, so Kobe has been a Laker for nearly half my life. My dad and I have been Lakers season tickets holders since Kobe was still in elementary school. If you include playoff games, I’ve probably watched him play in person over 400 times. So when I think about what Kobe means to me, it is not just about how much joy he has given me or how many times I’ve been able to be a witness to history, it is about how many of those moments and memories I was able to share with my dad.
When you reach your mid-30s, you begin to notice every time an athlete older than you retires from his sport. Before you know it, you can name all the ones who are left.
It is hard to imagine what life is going to be like without Kobe because it is so hard to remember what it was like before Kobe. I know it will not be an easy adjustment. I’m so lucky to have been able to watch two of the most breathtaking athletes of all-time. I’m worried that I will never get the chance to see another.

BUY THE BOOK!

nbaoffseason:

stevenlebron:

Book Update #9: Kobe Excerpt

So, I’ve (obviously) been talking about my book a lot here on the blog, and shared a lot of the artwork and layouts, but what about the writing? Well, happy you asked, because Andrew Ungvari, wrote a great foreword for my Kobe article, detailing Kobe’s relationship with the city of Los Angeles. 

The foreword was posted at Lakers Nation yesterday and I’ve posted it below. Again, order your copy of the book now while quantities are still available, the online store link is here and if you are just finding out about the project, this FAQ is your primer

Enjoy:

The relationship between a city and a star athlete is one of those things that can be described as both ridiculous and incredible. Ridiculous because often it is only a notch below stalker on the crazy scale and incredible in that one person’s ability to perform a skill has the ability to unite a city and remove those invisible barriers between strangers.

More often than not, it is no different from a husband and a wife or a father and son. Sometimes it is one that ends in an ugly divorce where the kids side with one parent over the other. Sometimes it ends in an amicable divorce where both sides openly admit to falling out of love and doing what’s best for everyone involved.

In the case of Kobe Bean Bryant, the relationship between he and the City of Los Angeles is one with many layers. You could say it most closely resembles that of a foster family. Kobe was the hotheaded teen that had a falling out with his parents, got kicked out of the house, and thought he knew everything when, in fact, he didn’t know shit about the things that mattered. L.A. was the naïve mom that was going to defend her son because he was her son dammit, and that was as good a reason as any. He might be an asshole, but he is my asshole.

If you asked a hundred Angelenos what Kobe means to them, you might get a different answer from everyone. If you asked someone born before 1990, they might tell you that Kobe is the torchbearer in a long line of Lakers and star players who have represented the city. Ask someone born after that, and you might hear words like idol, worship, deity, and God.

You can not begin to understand what Kobe means to the city without first understanding what the Lakers mean to the city. Like every other major metropolitan city, L.A. is made up of transplants from all over the world, many of whom will not get out of their cars in neighborhoods, where the billboards and storefronts are written in languages they do not understand. As a result, most prefer to be scared or remain ignorant rather than celebrate and share in all of these rich and wonderful cultures and nationalities. Heaven forbid we might enjoy the food in Thai Town or maybe learn something new at the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo.

Something magical happens when the Lakers win a championship. We all put our guards down and become a little nicer. We’re more likely to exchange a smile and a nod at a red light with the guy in the car next to us—the one with all the Lakers flags and LKRLOVR on the vanity plate. Suddenly, everyone is approachable. You can tell because you will end up having conversations about the Lakers with complete strangers everywhere you go.

It is at the championship parades when we see the city at its utopian best. That is when we laugh together, cheer together, and cry tears of joy together. Any athlete or owner that has played a part in bringing that feeling to the city will forever be remembered. Those who have done it as many times as Magic or Kobe are granted iconic status. They move from the sports section to the front page, from sports heroes to a part of the city’s history.

Magic was my hero growing up, so my feelings for Kobe are a little complicated. I’m not one of those people who thinks he is better than Michael Jordan or even the greatest Laker ever. I can not understand how anyone who was raised on Magic’s brilliance would not prefer his approach to watching a guy take 30 shots a game. That does not mean that I’m still not amazed not only by the things that Kobe can do, but by what he can still do after so many years of mileage.

I would best describe having season tickets during the Kobe Era like getting two for every one you buy. There’s the physical ticket gets you inside the building, and then there’s the invisible lottery ticket that comes with it—the one that gives you the chance at witnessing history. You could say that a ticket to any game in any sport comes with the chance to witness something historic. The difference with Kobe is that it is almost expected.

It could be a miracle shot at the buzzer that sends a game into overtime, followed by another that wins it in overtime. It could be 21 points in the game’s final 12 minutes to lead the Lakers back from a 27-point fourth quarter deficit. It could be 42 points in a half, like he did in his final game against Michael Jordan, or the 62 points he has scored in only three quarters, or the 81 points he scored against Toronto.

I’m 36, so Kobe has been a Laker for nearly half my life. My dad and I have been Lakers season tickets holders since Kobe was still in elementary school. If you include playoff games, I’ve probably watched him play in person over 400 times. So when I think about what Kobe means to me, it is not just about how much joy he has given me or how many times I’ve been able to be a witness to history, it is about how many of those moments and memories I was able to share with my dad.

When you reach your mid-30s, you begin to notice every time an athlete older than you retires from his sport. Before you know it, you can name all the ones who are left.

It is hard to imagine what life is going to be like without Kobe because it is so hard to remember what it was like before Kobe. I know it will not be an easy adjustment. I’m so lucky to have been able to watch two of the most breathtaking athletes of all-time. I’m worried that I will never get the chance to see another.

BUY THE BOOK!

"Some of the flagrant fouls that I see called nowadays, it makes me nauseous. You can’t touch a guy without it being a flagrant foul. I like the contact. Back then, if guys put their hands on you, you had to have the skill to be able to go both ways, change direction, post up, you had to have a mid-range game because you didn’t want to go all the way to the basket because you would get knocked ass over tea kettle. So I think playing the game back then required much more skill."

Kobe on the NBA becoming a ‘finesse’ league.

(Source: ESPN)


Lakers lost in OT to Chicago tonight (on a play with .9 seconds left), which sucks unless you’re part of the fan base that believes we should tank.

Let’s take a moment though to admire how well Swaggy P has been in the Kobe System.

43 minutes. 31 points on 11-23. 5 rebounds, 2 steals. 

Swaggy P in the Air Jordan 4 Retro ‘Fear’ and the Magic Johnson throwback.

Swaggy P in the Air Jordan 4 Retro ‘Fear’ and the Magic Johnson throwback.

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